Update 11 April, 2018

Update 11 April, 2018

Update 11 April, 2018

The engine was bolted into the Ground Test Vehicle using elastomeric (cushioned) engine mounts almost identical to the ones scheduled for the flying prototype. The Samson engine is being located further to the rear than the original Hayabusa engine was. This will help provide correct center of gravity without having to weld heavy steel weights to the rear of the GTV, as was required earlier. Additionally, this will allow a passenger to be carried in the GTV to record video and other data, and to gain a passenger viewpoint on ride quality.

Above you can see the engine at home behind the seats of the GTV, with the rear right wheel in the foreground. The GTV is just a welded tube representation of the Switchblade flying sports car chassis, and is no true representation of the final carbon fiber vehicle. It is very handy for testing and proving such things as steering, ride quality, and in this case, performance of the engine and transmission.

Other automotive parts are being introduced, including this piece below, which is part of a rear differential. The differential takes power from the engine and splits it out to the two rear wheels. All cars have one, and the parts shown below are parts of an automotive differential that is the smallest diameter we could find. Our differential has to fit under the ducted fan section of the body, so having a small diameter is critical. It also has to stand up to the nearly 200 hp of the Samson turbo-charged engine. Not that many people will want to race or hot rod their flying sports car, but this component is built to road standards and to provide years of trouble-free use, while remaining light enough to be used in a flying/driving application.

 

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